Paleontology & Geology Photography

A Geology blog of images taken with
a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

maintained by Whitman College
Walla Walla, Washington.
Scanning electron micrograph of a rodent incisor with gastric etch marks. Tooth from an owl pellet collected outside of Walla Walla, Washington. Image courtesy of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of a rodent incisor with gastric etch marks. Tooth from an owl pellet collected outside of Walla Walla, Washington. Image courtesy of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of the root end of a rodent incisor, bearing seriously gnarly etch marks from digestion inside of a carnivore’s gut (or so we think!). Image property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of the root end of a rodent incisor, bearing seriously gnarly etch marks from digestion inside of a carnivore’s gut (or so we think!). Image property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of the “chomping end” (courtesy of Prof. Spencer) of a rodent incisor extracted from an owl pellet; collected and photographed in Walla Walla, Washington by the Whitman College geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of the “chomping end” (courtesy of Prof. Spencer) of a rodent incisor extracted from an owl pellet; collected and photographed in Walla Walla, Washington by the Whitman College geology department.

Scanning Electron micrograph of a rodent incisor, covered in some very lovely signs of gastric etching into the enamel, revealing the dentine structure beneath. Found inside of an owl pellet collected in Walla Walla, Washington. Image Property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning Electron micrograph of a rodent incisor, covered in some very lovely signs of gastric etching into the enamel, revealing the dentine structure beneath. Found inside of an owl pellet collected in Walla Walla, Washington. Image Property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of a rodent microtine tooth, this time from an occlusal (grinding surface) view. Rodent teeth can be identified based on the number of open and closed triangles, so hopefully I will sit down and key this one out for fun.
Property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of a rodent microtine tooth, this time from an occlusal (grinding surface) view. Rodent teeth can be identified based on the number of open and closed triangles, so hopefully I will sit down and key this one out for fun.

Property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of a microtine rodent tooth, showing both normal wear patterns and gastric etching (lower left). From an owl pellet collected in southeastern Washington. Image property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of a microtine rodent tooth, showing both normal wear patterns and gastric etching (lower left). From an owl pellet collected in southeastern Washington. Image property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of a rodent molar in occlusal view. Image property of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning electron micrograph of a rodent molar in occlusal view. Image property of Whitman College, geology department.

A higher quality of the previously published microtine rodent tooth scanning electron micrograph. Look at that etching!
Image property of Whitman College, geo dept.

A higher quality of the previously published microtine rodent tooth scanning electron micrograph. Look at that etching!

Image property of Whitman College, geo dept.

Scanning electron micrograph of yet another microtine rodent tooth. This one has some seriously gnarly etching. If only the micrograph were of better quality! The stage kept moving while the image was being captured. Courtesy of Whitman College, geology dept.

Scanning electron micrograph of yet another microtine rodent tooth. This one has some seriously gnarly etching. If only the micrograph were of better quality! The stage kept moving while the image was being captured. Courtesy of Whitman College, geology dept.

Scanning Electron micrograph (SEM) of a rodent microtine tooth, from an owl pellet. Collected outside of Walla Walla, Washington. Image courtesy of Whitman College, geology department.

Scanning Electron micrograph (SEM) of a rodent microtine tooth, from an owl pellet. Collected outside of Walla Walla, Washington. Image courtesy of Whitman College, geology department.